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Dec 3, 2013

10-Minute Projects: Fabric Mouse Pad Tutorial

Dec 3, 2013
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I'm back with the third 10-Minute Project for this year.  Just in time for gifting season!  I'm not sure if many people use mouse pads anymore with all the wireless and tablet options, but I am a little bit old school perhaps.  I do all my blogging from a desktop in the den - and when we bought a new black desk, I decided I needed to revisit the mouse pad.  I was afraid something (read: the kids) might scratch the new paint.

I thought I'd do another quick tutorial for you all.  The best part about these 10-Minute Projects is that you'll probably spend more time choosing what fabric to use than actually making the project.

Materials.
  • (1) 7 1/2" x 9" fabric scrap
  • (1) 7 1/2" x 9" piece fusible web (I used Heat'n'Bond Lite)
  • (1) 7 1/2" x 9" cork
  • coordinating thread (optional)
1.  Cut the fabric, fusible web and cork all to 7 1/2" x 9" rectangles.
I picked up this cork roll from Joann's for just a couple dollars.  It's nice and thin, yet flexible.  It came in several sizes.  The 1 ft x 2 ft roll yielded 3 mouse pads.

I used my rotary cutter on the cork - and it worked like a charm.  But I only did this because my blade was pretty dull and needed to be changed.  I wouldn't recommend cutting the cork with a brand new rotary cutter blade since it will dull it for fabric.  Scissors work well on cork also.

2.  Place the fusible web bumpy side on the wrong side of the fabric.  Press to fuse the fusible web to the fabric.  Make sure to read the manufacturer’s instructions prior to beginning for appropriate heat settings and length of time to press.  For Heat 'N' Bond Lite, I usually press for about 8-10 seconds on a low (medium-low) setting.


3.  Peel the paper backing off of the fabric.  Now your fabric will have the fusible web on the wrong side of the fabric.  It is ready to apply to the cork.

Fuse the fabric (wrong side down) to the cork, making sure to center the shapes on top of each other.  Use the same technique and heat settings as step 2. 

4.  Use a cup or glass to trace a rounded corner profile on each of the four corners on the mouse pad.

5.  Use scissors to cut the rounded corners on the drawn lines.  Repeat until all four corners have been trimmed.

6.  (Optional)  Add a finished look if desired by topstitching 1/8" away from the edge of the pad all the way around the rounded rectangle.  Use a walking foot to help ease the cork through the machine.

All done!  








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16 comments:

  1. So you can actually sew the cork?? Do you do this with a walking foot and a regular needle? Thanks so much for this neat tutorial!

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  2. Thank you! I meant to include the fact that I did use a walking foot in the post. I will go back and add that info. Yes - you can sew through it just fine. I would use newer cork though (if you are upcycling), as if you use old and dry cork, it may crumble if you sew too close to the edge. Definitely use a walking foot. And I used a regular universal needle. I am sure the needles for thicker materials such as leather would work even better, but I had issues with the universal.

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    Replies
    1. NO issues with the universal. spell check!

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    2. Thank you, AnneMarie- I'm going to try this just as soon as I can stop at JoAnn for some cork :)

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  3. Cute idea...I also had no clue you could sew through cork!

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  4. This is awesome! I was looking for some quick gifts and these are perfect!

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  5. This is such a great idea! My IT brother will LOVE a geek-themed one!

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  6. What a great idea! I've been looking for a way to personalize my office. Thanks for the tutorial!

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  7. This combination would also make cute coasters. Thanks for sharing!

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  8. very cute idea! I agree-not sure who all still uses mouse pads but I DO need one for my store computer!

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  9. oh- just saw the note about coasters! Great idea!

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  10. I LOVE this! I have a glass desk at work and the mouse doesn't work well unless there is a pad. I am going to make these for my lady coworkers. I have stiffened felt, do you think that would work instead of the cork? hmmm

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    Replies
    1. I wonder if the felt would be too slippery on the glass? I chose cork because I thought it had some grip to it.... ?

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  11. great idea... easy and bright!

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